Final Thoughts

It is easy to personally identify with the struggle of a gladiator. Although the tradition has fallen from favor, it is the subject of rich imagination and interest for many. Through the process of my research, I have tried to put myself into the role of a gladiator. Ultimately I have come up short, the closest modern appropriation we have is football players, mixed martial arts fighters or bull fighters which is limited to a small percentage of the population. Although these sports still entertain a huge collection of people, overall our society has shifted our praise towards the intellectual pursuits.
I believe we live in a gladiatorial society, although the games have ended, we all compete viciously for a slice of the pie. Some people exhaust their physical and mental prowess to ultimately have the door slammed shut in their face. I don’t see any other reason why a free man would give up his ordinary existence for the chance for glory in the arena. Obviously after the novelty of comfort wears off and the ego subsides, many men are left looking for validation. There is either a chance to achieve glory or death. Some would rather this over living a marginal existence on the sideline.
A popular phrase, the whole world is a stage, is particularly fitting in this context.

While as a society, we work to build up our own lives behind the scenes, a contemporary arena exists for those wishing for their lives to play out in glory. Whether it is in the form of moving a football forward one hundred yards, fighting on a reality television show, fighting in war or dying in infamy. For most, ordinary life is fulfilling and safe. For those not satisfied, our modern day voyeuristic society supports their drama. There are 7 billion people on this Earth, and technology has led to our entire globalization. The moment someone decides to standout into the pressure cooker, their glory or fall from grace will be documented, debated and highly conversed.

While as a society, we work to build up our own lives behind the scenes, a contemporary arena exists for those wishing for their lives to play out in glory. Whether it is in the form of moving a football forward one hundred yards, fighting on a reality television show, fighting in war or dying in infamy. For most, ordinary life is fulfilling and safe. For those not satisfied, our modern day voyeuristic society supports their drama. There are 7 billion people on this Earth, and technology has led to our entire globalization. The moment someone decides to standout into the pressure cooker, their glory or fall from grace will be documented, debated and highly conversed.

Our society is one giant coliseum, although we choose to stay anonymous, we all are spectators. We have become desensitized to violence through all forms of popular media, yet try to act shocked at the new breaking story. People observe other people’s problems to feel better about their own. All this adds up to become a predator culture.
Even through the pursuit of educational accomplishment, individuals face harsh competition. The legitimacy of one diploma is slashed by the strength of another’s. While one person is inadequate to answer a question on Jeopardy, another laughs at their opponents insufficiency. As we move away from physical strength to brain power, academia may become the most savage of all arenas.

Years down the road, we all find our self’s on the sideline jealous of the perceived glory in the arena. Life loses meaning without a fight bigger than us, whether or not the sacrifice has a solid foundation at all. This driving force to continue the construction of civilization through personal contribution may be applied to describe events through human history. I believe that the gladiatorial games were a reflection of humanity’s flaw that is still recurrent, despite how advanced we believe our species to be.

/Chopped Head/ the brutality of a hollywoodized gladiator’s existence 4/28/2013


movieclips.(10/27/2011). Gladiator (4/8) Movie CLIP – Are You Not Entertained? (2000) HD . Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FI1ylg4GKv8

It is hard for a most modern day viewers to stomach scenes of intense graphic violence, although that statement is debateble with the success of long running series of B-rated horror films in 3d.

Texas-Chainsaw-3D-UK-Quad-Poster

http://filumreviews.blogspot.com/2013/01/review-texas-chainsaw-3d.html

tumblr_m9bkiusYQw1rbvhreo1_500
http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/dina%20meyer?language=fr_FR

or the sick minds behind SAW 1,2,3,4,5,6,3D….

pee-wee-herman

http://gossip-juice.com/the-news/pee-wee-herman-at-jay-leno-show/
Or the sick mind of this individual

Life of a Gladiator 4/23/2013

this scene depicts the “bestiarii, a beast fighter”

The history of the gladiatorial tradition was a harsh reality for most. In the beginning, many were forced into combat despite their will. Prisoners of war, slaves and criminals were all subject to being forced into the games. Recruits had no rights to object to their role or they could face public execution for their defiance. The path each recruit followed was heavily predetermined by their individual situation. For example, a prisoner of war, from a specific region of Rome’s empire, would train and fight in a specific gladiatorial school specific to his heritage. Their ethnic background determined which armor they would wear, the weapons they would use and the actual fight they would train for. Each gladiator school was taught by an ex-gladiator who specialized in each combat.

Gladiators did enjoy an amount of creature comforts, despite common misconception. Although all gladiators had to face death in the arena, each individual received three meals a day and the ability to bathe. In order to help the warriors perform, they were given massages and slave women. The life of a gladiator was often appealing enough for free men to sign away their rights in order to fight for fame and glory. Before competition, a last meal was provided for each gladiator. Since death was an unavoidable reality for most fighters, each individual was taught to die with dignity, honor and grace.

all above information appropriated from
http://www.tribunesandtriumphs.org/gladiators/life-of-a-gladiator.htm

Modern Day Colosseums 4/4/2013

In order of capacity, not personal preference…
medium_4

michigan-stadium_660
Michigan Stadium aka THE BIG HOUSE 109,901 capacity
http://www.mgoblue.com/facilities/michigan-stadium.html

Beaver Stadium during football game vs. Temple, Sept. 20, 2008

Beaver Stadium 106,572 capacity
GO BEAVERS

aerial
Sanford Stadium 92,746-seat capacity
GO GEORGIA

Autzen7
Autzen Stadium 54,000 capacity one of the top “10 Intimidating Stadiums”

http://aecom.com/vgn-ext-templating/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=e5b312d4507f9210VgnVCM100000089e1bacRCRD&vgnextchannel=314ebaa1aca72210VgnVCM100000089e1bacRCRD&vgnextfmt=default

Gladiator_mascot_head
^the intensity of a gladiator mascot

Rome Colosseum: History of the Gladiatorial Games 4/1/2013

All information appropriated from http://romancolosseum.org/roman-colosseum-history/

panorama

© Pictures of Rome courtesy of Rome.info

Following the suicide-death of Emperor Nero in 68 AD, a civil war divided the landscape of ancient Rome. After a tumultuous rise and fall of three successive emperors until the institutionalization of Emperor Vespasian, this went on to become the first acknowledged ruler of the Flavian Dynasty.

vespasian

^This guy^

To return peace and to distant his public image away from the highly despised Nero, Vespasian went on to construct several architectural projects this included the coliseum. After his unfortunate timing of death in 79 AD, his oldest son Titus continued to finish the construction on the Coliseum. It was officially open to the public a year later.

Costumed-groups-of-people-parade-around-the-Colosseum-Circus-Maximus-and-Forum-650x433

To celebrate the “grand opening”, Titus dedicated one hundred days of games for his father’s vision. 9,000 animals and hundreds of gladiators were participated

The gladiatorial games were an institution for 450 years, but started to fall from public favor around the 3rd century due to the rise of Christianity.

colossal_statue_of_constantine1320642528275

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